Twitter
technmsg

Monthly Archive for March, 2004

Open Source GIS Mapping

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are growing in popularity. Commercial and goverment interests alike are investing heavily in mapping software such as ArcView. A single day doesn’t go by without someone sending me directions generated by MapQuest. Oddly enough, Mapquest’s aerial views seem to have mysteriously disappeared after the formation of the Department of Homeland Security. […]

Read Full Post »

Dell BIG-IP PowerEdge

The Dell PowerEdge Load Balancing Server is a product that doesn’t get a lot of attention. BIG-IP is a product line of application traffic management appliances from F5 Networks that gets it’s due share of attention from the right sort of crowd. Load balancers and more; their high-end appliances can be configured with FIPS (Federal […]

Read Full Post »

The Cisco PIX 515E Firewall is one hell of a versatile appliance. We won’t bother citing the performance specs since they are readily available on Cisco’s product page (linked above), but one of the nice features is it’s capability for expansion. Sure enough, if you open up the rear slot cover, you’ll see a PCI […]

Read Full Post »

Our primary mail exchanger (MX) receives the bulk of the mail for our domain. Within the past few months we’ve noticed an increase in the amount of mail delivered directly to our secondary MX. This is unusual, since the priority of the secondary (40) is set quite a bit higher than the primary (10). Of […]

Read Full Post »

At some point we noticed phantom entries in the Postfix mail log, mixed in with the rest of our valid mail. These phantom entries never took a long time to process, so we weren’t all that concerned about processor or bandwidth usage. Nevertheless after forcing yourself to ignore these useless entries for a while, you […]

Read Full Post »

Listing Apache Virtual Hosts

After configuring a dozen virtual hosts, we wanted a list of domains to give to the managers, so they’d know which sites we were hosting. Rather than compile a list by hand every time they asked, why not use the shell to spit one out on-the-fly? This leaves more time for other things, like standing […]

Read Full Post »

When taking care of virtual hosts, the hope is that you can setup the owner’s privileges and then walk away. The following snippet will grant a user-to-be-created full privileges on a fresh database, without giving them GRANT permissions. $ mysql -uroot -p Enter password: xxxxxx Welcome to the MySQL monitor. Commands end with ; or […]

Read Full Post »

With a few dozen Sun boxes floating around the datacenter, someone once asked me how to determine the number and speed of processors on a specific machine. Coming from the BSD/Linux side of things, Solaris is an operating system that mystifies me from time to time. On some Linux distributions, top gives you that information. […]

Read Full Post »

You have a rack full of servers. Lots of noise, heat, blinking lights and LEDs. Without decent labeling, you’d be seriously lost. Sharpie is good, but tends to be rather permanent. What happens when you change a machine’s name/purpose? Adhesive labels fall off, especially with all the forced air being circulated in data centers. The […]

Read Full Post »

Killing worms with Procmail

SpamAssassin – while noble in its quest to rid our email of spam – takes time and bandwidth to run all of its RBL-based checks. The more we can filter out before the message is piped to SpamAssassin, the better. The latest batch of worms seems to be as good a target as any. I’m […]

Read Full Post »